AAAS David Miller

December 3, 2013

AAAS Council Elects 388 New AAAS Fellows

"Meeting Global Challenges: Discovery and Innovation" is the theme for the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting but it also describes the achievements of the new AAAS Fellows.

For example, Robert Geahlen, distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry at Purdue University, discovered Syk, an enzyme that affects the growth of different types of cancer cells.

Ole Isacson, professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, helped create induced pluripotent stem cells, which will enable researchers to study Parkinson's disease outside of patients.

Innovative research by Klaus Lackner, professor of geophysics, earth and environmental engineering at Columbia University, showed that automation and technology can support a more nimble and decentralized energy infrastructure.

Jay Lockman, Green Bank Telescope principal scientist at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, identified the Lockman Hole, an area of the sky where astronomers can conduct surveys obscured by a minimal amount of neutral hydrogen gas.

And, Adele Wolfson, professor of physical and natural sciences and professor of chemistry at Wellesley College, developed innovative curricula for molecular biology, including semester-long, project-based labs and the use of advanced instrumentation in introductory biochemistry classes.

Geahlen, Isacson, Lackner, Lockman and Wolfson are among the 388 newly-elected AAAS Fellows who were recognized by their peers for their efforts to advance science or its applications. The new AAAS Fellows, whose names will be published in the 29 November issue of Science, will be honored at the AAAS Fellows Forum on Saturday, 15 February during the AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago, where they will receive a certificate and a blue and gold rosette as a symbol of their distinguished accomplishments.

"Meeting Global Challenges: Discovery and Innovation" is the theme for the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting but it also describes the achievements of the new AAAS Fellows.

For example, Robert Geahlen, distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry at Purdue University, discovered Syk, an enzyme that affects the growth of different types of cancer cells.

Ole Isacson, professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, helped create induced pluripotent stem cells, which will enable researchers to study Parkinson's disease outside of patients.

Innovative research by Klaus Lackner, professor of geophysics, earth and environmental engineering at Columbia University, showed that automation and technology can support a more nimble and decentralized energy infrastructure.

Jay Lockman, Green Bank Telescope principal scientist at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, identified the Lockman Hole, an area of the sky where astronomers can conduct surveys obscured by a minimal amount of neutral hydrogen gas.

And, Adele Wolfson, professor of physical and natural sciences and professor of chemistry at Wellesley College, developed innovative curricula for molecular biology, including semester-long, project-based labs and the use of advanced instrumentation in introductory biochemistry classes.

Geahlen, Isacson, Lackner, Lockman and Wolfson are among the 388 newly-elected AAAS Fellows who were recognized by their peers for their efforts to advance science or its applications. The new AAAS Fellows, whose names will be published in the 29 November issue of Science, will be honored at the AAAS Fellows Forum on Saturday, 15 February during the AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago, where they will receive a certificate and a blue and gold rosette as a symbol of their distinguished accomplishments.