News

Insurance commissioner outlines ACA challenges

November 17, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/11/16/insurance-commissioner-outlines-aca-challenges/

Since 2014 the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, has assisted lower- and moderate-income people who buy insurance on their own on the individual market, providing premium subsidies and discounts on out-of-pocket expenses. Under the law, people who don’t carry compliant insurance face a penalty, the so-called individual mandate. Large employers who don’t offer insurance are also penalized.

Vanderbilt MPH’s Schaffner: Disparities in influenza outcomes

November 10, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/10/30/disparities-in-influenza-outcomes/?utm_source=research_email&utm_medium=research_email&utm_campaign=research_email_2017-11-03

Influenza infections kill between 3,000 and 49,000 people each year in the United States. Understanding risk factors for severe influenza outcomes, such as hospitalization, can help guide vaccination programs and reduce disease burden.Rameela Chandrasekhar, Ph.D., and colleagues evaluated whether neighborhood determinants – represented by census tract data – contribute to the risk of influenza hospitalization.

JAMA Pediatrics: MPH’s Williams lead author on pediatric pneumonia study

November 10, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/11/09/amoxicillin-alone-better-choice-for-pediatric-pneumonia-study/

A combination of two antibiotics is often prescribed to treat community-acquired pneumonia in children, but a JAMA Pediatrics study is now showing that using just one of the two has the same benefit to patients in most cases. Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers reported this week that amoxicillin alone, rather than combined with azithromycin, is just as effective and a better choice as it relates to efforts to curb antibiotic resistance.

MPH alumnus Creech leads Vanderbilt's international effort to develop universal flu vaccine

October 27, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/10/26/vanderbilt-leads-international-effort-to-develop-universal-flu-vaccine/

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center are leading an international effort to develop a universal influenza vaccine that would protect everyone against all strains of the flu anywhere in the world. The Universal Influenza Vaccine Initiative, which was announced today, will be led by James Crowe Jr., M.D., director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, and C. Buddy Creech, M.D., MPH, associate professor of Pediatrics and director of the Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

MPH's Schaffner Recommends Booster Dose of Mumps Vaccine in Outbreaks

October 27, 2017

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/experts-recommend-booster-dose-mumps-vaccine-outbreaks-n814406

Mumps is bad this year in the U.S. So far, more than 4,600 cases have been reported. So the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted to recommend that people at high risk of catching mumps during an outbreak get a booster dose of the vaccine, even if they’ve already been vaccinated twice. “The information is limited although the limited information would indicate that the third dose does reduce your risk of getting the disease,” said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University and the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases.

Forum highlights strong clinical, translational research efforts

October 19, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/10/19/forum-highlights-strong-clinical-translational-research-efforts/

The 2017 Vanderbilt Translational Research Forum was co-hosted by the Office of Clinical & Translational Scientist Development, Master of Public Health, and Master of Science in Clinical Investigation on October 13, 2017. The event began with the presentation of awards for Distinguished Service to Translational Scientists to Paul Harris, Ph.D., and for Excellence in Mentoring Translational Scientists to Kathryn Edwards, M.D.

In Scientific American, Schaffner comments on increased vaccination rates and school immunization laws

October 18, 2017

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/school-immunization-laws-are-making-kindergarteners-safer/

Vaccination rates for kindergartners are increasing because of state laws requiring them to have the full series of inoculations before they can enter the classroom. The laws vary, “but overall they say, ‘We have to protect our children.’ It's terrific,” says William Schaffner, professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University. 

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