News

MPH’s Buntin: Latest ACA repeal bill could hit those with pre-existing conditions

September 20, 2017

http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/industries/health-care/2017/09/18/health-care-obamacare-repeal-bcra-ahca-tennessee/677123001/

The latest Obamacare repeal-and-replace bill in the U.S. Senate raises the possibility that Tennesseans with pre-existing diseases could see increased costs or change in coverage. Under the proposal, states could choose to set new regulations on how much can be charged to people with pre-existing conditions who buy insurance on the market, whether insurers can limit benefits over a lifetime, and what insurance plans have to cover, said Melinda Buntin, chair of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine's health policy department.

Vanderbilt University climbs ‘U.S. News & World Report’ rankings to reach No. 14

September 14, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/09/12/vanderbilt-university-climbs-u-s-news-world-report-rankings-to-reach-no-14/

U.S. News & World Report today named Vanderbilt University as one of the best universities in the country as part of the publication’s annual rankings of top universities. Vanderbilt rose to 14th place this year, its highest ranking to date, after holding at No. 15 the two previous years.

New V-STTaR program to be led by MPH alumni Roumie and Talbot

August 31, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/08/31/program-for-scientists-to-move-discoveries-into-clinical-practice/

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) has established a new career development program for scientists in implementation research. The goal is to speed the uptake and translation of scientific discoveries into routine clinical practice. The program, called Vanderbilt Scholars in T4 Translational Research, or V-STTaR, is supported by a five-year, $3 million grant awarded this month by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). T4 refers to the translation of research findings into “real world” and community settings.

MPH's Schaffner: Hurricane Harvey’s Public Health Impact Extends Beyond Flooding

August 29, 2017

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/harvey-public-health-impact_us_59a42136e4b06d67e33913a6

Since Hurricane Harvey hit Texas on Friday, 10 people have died and many others have been injured and trapped in their flooded houses. But beyond the immediate dangers posed by the flooding, experts are worried about the broader threats to public health. Vulnerable populations, like the homeless, the elderly and the chronically ill, are especially at risk during and in the aftermath of a disaster. Dr.

MPH's Etherington is the new Chair of the Metropolitan Board of Health of Nashville and Davidson County

August 17, 2017

http://www.nashville.gov/News-Media/News-Article/ID/6700/Metro-Board-of-Health-Changes-of-Board-Members.aspx

Carol Etherington, MSN, RN, FAAN was recently elected as Chair of the Metropolitan Board of Health of Nashville and Davidson County. Etherington established one of the first police-based counseling programs in the U.S. to serve victims of violent crime and has worked multiple disasters across the U.S. including earthquakes, hurricanes, school shootings and New York City post 9/11. She served on an international emergency medical team in the aftermath of the Pol Pot genocide and completed four missions in war-torn Bosnia.

MPH's Nikpay comments on the 340B drug discount program

August 10, 2017

https://www.marketplace.org/2017/08/08/health-care/seniors-are-paying-200-million-more-drugs-they-need-says-federal-government

Federal health officials say a controversial program that allows hospitals to purchase drugs at deep discounts needs some fixing.The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS, worry hospitals are playing fast and loose with what’s known as the 340B program by buying more expensive drugs than they have to, putting the squeeze on Medicare recipients.

MPH’s Schaffner to focus on specific treatment course based on type of infection before recommendation change

July 27, 2017

http://www.today.com/health/completing-course-antibiotics-not-always-necessary-t114320

For the last 75 years, people with a bacterial infection have been told it is essential to finish all of an antibiotic prescription, usually seven to 10 days, to keep from getting sick again. But British researchers are now saying that patients may not need to “complete the course,” that it may actually be contributing to antibiotic resistance. "

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