News

MPH Program alum Acra part of team to treat boy's rare disorder

March 3, 2016

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2016/03/clinicians-researchers-team-to-treat-boys-rare-disorder/

Sari Acra, M.D., MPH was involved in the the team to help treat Denny Majano when he was admitted to the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital in 2011. After spending almost two and a half years in the hospital, at many times struggling to survive, Denny spent his first Christmas home this past December with his mother, father and sister. His case exemplifies what happens when basic science meets clinical care.  

Zika virus: Mosquito-borne transmission still the most likely in U.S. says MPH's Schaffner

February 24, 2016

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/zika-virus-outbreak/now-it-s-15-cases-sexually-transmitted-zika-virus-us-n524286

Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, past president of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, says its not likely that sexual transmission is anywhere close to the frequency of mosquito-borne transmission as the CDC reports 14 new cases of sexually transmitted Zika in U.S.

Nashville Health Care Council selects MPH graduate Neal Patel, MD, MPH

February 18, 2016

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2016/02/nashville-health-care-council-selects-chang-patel/

Vanderbilt MPH Program alumnus Neal Patel, M.D., M.P.H., has been named to the Nashville Health Care Council's 2016 Council Fellows class. The Council Fellows initiative was launched in 2013 to engage industry leaders in clearly defining health care’s greatest challenges while exploring business strategies to navigate complex issues facing the nation’s health care system.

ABC News talks to MPH's Creech about Zika virus and ocular birth defects

February 9, 2016

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/zika-virus-linked-infant-eye-abnormalities-study/story?id=36810603

The Zika virus may be associated with another birth defect in infants, according to a new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Ophthalmology. Buddy Creech, M.D., M.P.H., an associate professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said other viruses, including herpes and rubella, are known to cause ocular birth defects in infants.

Prostate cancer survivors’ risk of heart disease studied by MPH alumna Morgans

February 5, 2016

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2016/02/prostate-cancer-survivors-risk-of-heart-disease-studied/

The 3 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States are likely to die from something other than cancer, thanks to early detection, effective treatment and the disease’s slow progression.What survivors need to be more concerned with is heart disease, the most common non-cancer cause of death for men with prostate cancer, according to a paper published this week in Circulation, authored by Vanderbilt physicians, including MPH alumna Alicia Morgans, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of Medicine, and MPH faculty David Penson, M.D., M.P.H.

NYT: W.H.O. Zika Virus announcement is a wake-up call says MPH's Schaffner

February 2, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/02/health/zika-virus-world-health-organization.html?ref=world&_r=2

The World Health Organization declared the Zika virus and its suspected link to birth defects an international public health emergency on Monday, a rare move that signals the seriousness of the outbreak and gives countries new tools to fight it. “This makes it formal,” said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University. “If there is a ministry of health anywhere that hasn’t awakened to this problem, this will do that.”

NYT: MPH's Schaffner puzzled by new C.D.C. Zika guidelines

January 21, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/20/health/cdc-urges-zika-testing-for-some-who-are-pregnant.html?_r=1

Pregnant women who feel sick and have visited countries in which the Zika virus is spreading should see a doctor soon and be tested for infection even though the tests are imperfect, federal health officials said on Tuesday. “That had me scratching my head,” Dr. William Schaffner,the chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University, said. “Most cases are asymptomatic, and nothing I’ve read says that women need to be symptomatic for the baby to be affected.”

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