News

MPH Program faculty and alumni led study: Flu vaccine helps reduce hospitalizations due to influenza pneumonia

October 8, 2015

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2015/10/flu-vaccine-helps-reduce-hospitalizations-due-to-influenza-pneumonia-study/

More than half of hospitalizations due to influenza pneumonia could be prevented by influenza vaccination, according to a study led by MPH Program faculty, published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.The Vanderbilt team included Carlos Grijalva, M.D., MPH; Yuwei Zhu, M.D., M.S.; Derek Williams, M.D., MPH; Wesley Self, M.D., MPH; Marie Griffin, M.D., MPH; and Kathryn Edwards, M.D.

H3N2 strain is included in 2015 flu shot says MPH Program's Schaffner

October 7, 2015

http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/07/health/flu-shot-vaccine-2015/

This year's flu shot is expected to be more effective than last season's vaccine. Last year was a pretty bad flu season because the H3N2 strain was the predominant strain, according to Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine who works at Vanderbilt University's Department of Medicine. Last year, when the virus mutated, the vaccine was only about 19% effective. But even some protection is better than no protection, Schaffner said.

Babies with NAS treatable, best way to stay with their mothers says MPH Program alumna

October 2, 2015

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/pregnant-women-tennessee_560da1b2e4b0af3706e01fb3

In 2014, Tennessee passed a bill allowing women to be charged with assault if they use narcotics while pregnant, health advocates warned that the law would deter women from seeking vital medical care out of fear of being prosecuted. Now, Dr. Jessica Young, an obstetrician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville who has a clinic for opiate-dependent pregnant women, said she’s had patients tell her they are now planning on delivering out of state. Others simply drop off the radar.

MPH Program's Dr. Barocas: Reduced prostate screening could miss advanced tumors

September 30, 2015

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/reduced-prostate-screening-could-miss-advanced-tumors/

Relaxed guidelines on prostate cancer screening may delay diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors, a new study suggests. In 2011, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended against routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, to curb over-diagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer. Since then, PSA screening has dropped by 28 percent, the researchers report.

MPH Program alumna study: Patients prefer online post-surgical care to in-person visit

September 28, 2015

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2015/09/23/Study-Patients-prefer-online-post-surgical-care-to-in-person-visit/8281443029982/

A small study at Vanderbilt University Medical Center shows that patients who have routine, uncomplicated surgeries prefer to have their postoperative visits done online, rather than go to a doctor's office in person. MPH Program alumna, Dr. Kummerow Broman, a resident physician in general surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center said "Some operations simply require an in-person assessment.

MPH student reflects on practicum experience in Guatemala

September 24, 2015

http://www.globalhealthhub.org/2015/09/21/luck-and-public-health-programming-in-guatemala/

Grace Fletcher is a candidate in Vanderbilt's M.P.H. in Global Health and M.A. in Latin American Studies programs. She completed her public health practicum working with Wuqu’ Kawoq, a non-governmental organization dedicated to improving the health of Maya communities and Mayan languages in Guatemala. Grace focused specifically on monitoring and evaluation efforts for nutrition and education programs in Santiago Sacatepéquez, Guatemala.

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