News

MPH's Schaffner: Avian flu unlikely to spread among people despite positive tests in TN chickens

March 7, 2017

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/bird-flu-found-tennessee-chicken-farm-virus-surges/story?id=45938138

An outbreak of avian flu in Tennessee has health officials on alert as the virus has surged across parts of Asia in recent months.The Tennessee Department of Agriculture confirmed yesterday that approximately 74,000 chickens from a commercial farm in Lincoln County were culled after some of the animals tested positive for a strain of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Dr.

Flu-related doctor visits cut by 48 percent, MPH's Schaffner comments

February 20, 2017

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/flu-related-doctor-visits-cut-48-vaccine-study/story?id=45533852

The current seasonal influenza vaccine has been found to be 48 percent effective in preventing flu-related medical visits, according to a preliminary report in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. "We know that influenza vaccine is a good but not perfect vaccine," said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.  

MPH's Cooper: Patient complaints helps identify surgeons with higher rates of bad surgical outcomes

February 17, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/02/15/patient-complaints-can-identify-surgeons-with-higher-rates-of-bad-surgical-outcomes-study/

Recording and analyzing patient and family reports about rude and disrespectful behavior can identify surgeons with higher rates of surgical site infections and other avoidable adverse outcomes, according to a study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) investigators in collaboration with six other major academic health systems.

MPH's Buntin weighs in on Chattanooga’s latest health ranking

February 16, 2017

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/local/story/2017/feb/15/chattanoogone-least-healthy-citites-us/412941/

Chattanooga ranked 132nd, behind Nashville and Knoxville in Tennessee, although well ahead of Memphis, which ranked third from the bottom — a dishonor awarded to Detroit.As with any such survey, the results depended on the criteria used for the ranking. The "health care" category, for example, was based on the cost of a medical or dental visit; the number of family doctors, dentists, hospital beds, and mental health counselors per capita; health insurance coverage; and premature death rates, among others. Chattanooga ranked a dismal 144th.

As Mumps hit a 10-year-high, MMR's lifelong protection may be false says MPH's Schaffner

February 13, 2017

http://www.consumerreports.org/mumps/should-you-get-a-mumps-booster/

Mumps is on the rise in some parts of the U.S., and some public health professionals are wondering whether the current vaccine may be not quite up to the task. Our long-held assumption that the MMR's protection is lifelong may not be entirely true. After 10 to 15 years, effectiveness against the mumps may diminish, according to William Schaffner, M.D., a professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee.

MPH graduate Patel serves as a VUMC site investigator for US DOD award

February 9, 2017

https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2017/02/09/new-grants-bolster-trauma-programs-research-initiatives/

MPH graduate Mayur Patel is one of the VUMC site investigators for the US DOD award to create a nationwide network of trauma systems and centers capable of conducting detailed research to improve military care. In its initial project, the LITES Network is expected to provide epidemiological data on moderate and severe injuries in the U.S. and identify any regional variations in the types of injuries and the way they’re managed.

MPH alumna Robinson: New 2017 Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents

February 9, 2017

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6605e1.htm?s_cid=mm6605e1_e

In October 2016, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger—United States, 2017. Changes in the 2017 immunization schedules for children and adolescents aged 18 years or younger include new or revised ACIP recommendations for influenza; human papillomavirus; hepatitis B; Haemophilus influenzae type B; pneumococcal; meningococcal; and diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccines.

Pages