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Residency

The Vanderbilt Psychiatry Residency program was founded in 1947 and offers an opportunity for residents to receive training in general psychiatry and to begin a career balanced with clinical and academic possibilities. 

As one of the leading centers in the nation for medical education, advanced patient care and biomedical research, Vanderbilt has a tradition of preparing physicians for careers in psychiatry.

Our four-year program is ACGME accredited with 9 resident positions each year. Entering at the PGY 1 level assures the progression through a carefully considered sequence of training designed to develop a broad set of clinical and academic skills.

Our program will accept residents at the PGY 2 level provided they come from any primary care specialty including pediatrics, internal medicine, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, or surgery.

The program is divided into four years of training, with most of the clinical training taking place at Vanderbilt University Hospital, Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital and clinics, Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, and the Nashville Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center.

A distinguished faculty, with expertise in general psychiatry, child and adolescent psychiatry, addiction psychiatry, community psychiatry, forensic psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine, and geriatric psychiatry ensures the best in graduate medical education.

For more information please review this presentation or contact:
Stephan Heckers, M.D.

Chair, Department of Psychiatry
Director, Residency Training Program

Department of Psychiatry  |  Vanderbilt School of Medicine
Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital  |  1601 23rd Ave. S.  |  Nashville, TN 37212
Phone: (615) 936-3555  |  Fax:  (615) 343-8400 (fax)

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