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Modulating stress circuits

Feb. 15, 2019—Feb. 14, 2019, 12:00 PM by Leigh MacMillan (iStock) Stress contributes to psychiatric diseases including depression, eating disorders and addiction. Neurons that express the stress signal corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in a brain region called the BNST are thought to promote negative responses to stress. Danny Winder, PhD, and colleagues reported in The Journal of Neuroscience that...

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Adhesion protein optimizes border

Feb. 15, 2019—Feb. 14, 2019, 10:45 AM by Leigh MacMillan (iStock) The epithelial cells that line the intestines build a specialized cell surface — the “brush border” — that processes and absorbs nutrients, and defends against pathogens. The brush border consists of thousands of finger-like membrane protrusions (microvilli) on each cell. Matthew Tyska, PhD, and colleagues previously implicated...

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New target for chronic kidney disease

Feb. 6, 2019—Jan. 31, 2019, 10:00 AM by Leigh MacMillan The kidney has a remarkable capacity to repair itself following acute injury, but maladaptive repair can lead to fibrosis (scarring) and chronic kidney disease. Craig Brooks, PhD, and collaborators at Harvard previously reported that after injury, some kidney proximal tubule cells (PTCs) are arrested in the G2-M...

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Designing antibodies to fight the flu

Feb. 6, 2019—Jan. 31, 2019, 10:30 AM by Bill Snyder (iStock) The influenza virus is an annual threat to public health around the world. Rapid changes in viral surface proteins (antigens), however, make it difficult to identify antibodies with broadly neutralizing activity against different influenza subtypes. Reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, James...

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Cell death pathway implicated in bone marrow failure

Feb. 6, 2019—Jan. 31, 2019, 9:40 AM From left, Sandra Zinkel, MD, PhD, Christi Salisbury-Ruf, MS, Patrice Wagner, PhD, Jing Zou, MD, PhD, and Yuliya Hassan have linked a specific form of programmed cell death to myelodysplastic syndrome, a type of bone marrow failure. by Leigh MacMillan The production of blood cells in the bone marrow —...

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Caprioli Earns 2019 ABRF Annual Award for Outstanding Contributions to Biomolecular Technologies

Jan. 28, 2019—The 2019 ABRF Annual Award for Outstanding Contributions to Biomolecular Technologies will be presented to Richard M. Caprioli, the Stanford Moore Professor of Biochemistry and Director of the Mass Spectrometry Research Center at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Dr. Caprioli’s research focuses on the discovery of temporal and spatial processes in biological systems using mass...

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Crowe leads ‘sprint’ to find anti-Zika antibodies

Jan. 25, 2019—by Bill Snyder Scientists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues in Boston, Seattle and St. Louis are racing to develop — in a mere 90 days — a protective antibody-based treatment that can stop the spread of the Zika virus. This is the first of four “scientific sprints” sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research...

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American Chemical Society honors Lindsley’s research

Jan. 25, 2019—Jan. 24, 2019, 10:26 AM by Bill Snyder The year is starting off with a bang for Craig Lindsley, PhD, director of medicinal chemistry in the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD). Craig Lindsley, PhD Earlier this month Lindsley won the inaugural Scientific Achievement Award in Drug Discovery and Development from the American Society for Pharmacology...

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Major grant to bolster research on inflammation-related cancers

Jan. 24, 2019—Jan. 23, 2019, 11:47 AM A new grant is helping Eunyoung Choi, PhD, left, James Goldenring, MD, PhD, Jimin Min, PhD, and colleagues around the globe to study inflammation-related cancers. (photo by John Russell) by Tom Wilemon Cancer Research UK has awarded a 20-million-pound grant (about $26 million U.S.) to a team of international investigators,...

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